dogging in

Discuss working your Gundog or tell us about your experiences be it sublime or ridiculous!
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David
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Re: dogging in

Post by David » Wed Oct 11, 2017 6:11 pm

I think I'd be walking a zigzag over that ground and getting the dog running across as I turn.

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ips
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Re: dogging in

Post by ips » Wed Oct 11, 2017 6:36 pm

Funny you should mention that David. I found myself doing that very thing this evening, well not the whole field but a zig zag to get her to cast further to the side rather than forward. Also meant that I was in effect making slower head way. Vid to follow,if it worked as was raining and getting dark. 😞
Muddling along in the hope that one day it starts to make sense.

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ips
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Re: dogging in

Post by ips » Wed Oct 11, 2017 7:23 pm

Here we go, tonight. Walking slow, zig zagging a bit and lots of hand command to hunt. Poor quality due to light and camera not at correct angle but you should get the idea. So, any improvement...or not ??

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NWIIqCpWikk
Muddling along in the hope that one day it starts to make sense.

Naj
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Re: dogging in

Post by Naj » Wed Oct 11, 2017 11:02 pm

I used to quarter a spaniel out to 15 yards either side when I was shooting over them but I agree with David you'll cover more ground and get her working side to side rather than pulling forward by zig-zagging yourself. But you could happily spend all day hunting through big fields like that in proper style so I think you really are going to have to be more selective in hunting where you're likely to find the majority of birds trying to sneak out. With the best will in the world you're not going to find all the stragglers and turn them back.

Naj

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ips
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Re: dogging in

Post by ips » Thu Oct 12, 2017 7:06 am

Exactly naj, but you got to have a look 😉
As I said it would take all day to hunt like that, which is why I decided to let her range a bit more. I am beginning to understand why keepers have dogs just for dogging in 😞
Muddling along in the hope that one day it starts to make sense.

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ips
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Re: dogging in

Post by ips » Thu Oct 12, 2017 8:06 am

Having watched footage of the first week or so of dogging in (handy things cameras for looking back at stuff) it would appear that as time has progressed and she has become accustomed to the route she is pulling out more than she was at first. I have also had the occasional incident were she has winded a bird and legged it. Hard work at times this gundog mallarkey.
Going to get her in a wood and see how she does in cover rather than fields and hedgerows.
Muddling along in the hope that one day it starts to make sense.

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ips
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Re: dogging in

Post by ips » Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:44 am

Quick hour on estate just before lunch. A field with not many birds but lots of scent and a overgrown ditch hunted out. I treated it as a training session rather than dogging in. Did numerous stops and recalls when she got distracted lining scent, and did some heelwork and lead training. All went well.
One minor thing I did differently was popped lead on before getting her out of car and waited a minute for her to chill out. No idea if it had any effect but she did seem more compliant.
Muddling along in the hope that one day it starts to make sense.

deefer+tag
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Re: dogging in

Post by deefer+tag » Thu Oct 12, 2017 7:42 pm

When you're teaching a dog to quarter as a pup you "zigzag" to get the pattern in, so it's just going back to school with her to remind her. If she's going too far forward and more straight lining, stand your ground so she comes back to you, do your zigzag, yes they get to know where they're going so change your route, when you're hunting her and she starts pulling on, threaten her - as in growl, go to run at her but really stamp your feet so it sounds like a giant coming at her - also, change direction so she has to keep an eye on you, if you think she's pulling on to flush, try to get her to leave it and hunt on in a different direction, if she won't she's not listening so you've got to go and get her and remind her who's in charge! I'm being careful of how I'm wording this as I seem to remember that you are a very positive trainer! All this will make your dogging in slower, I wonder if you are sometimes a bit hard on yourself!

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ips
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Re: dogging in

Post by ips » Thu Oct 12, 2017 8:30 pm

Thank you deefer, I know were your coming from 😉 yes I don't use physical correction however I have no problem with a verbal reprimand or for want of a better expression "physical intimidation" as in body posturing.
I did the zig zag to train quartering when she was younger so I have reverted back to that and stopping every now and then and she does migrate back to me. As you say it does take a lot longer to get around the land. Changing route is difficult though due to the terrain.
Tonight went well she was very compliant (in my eyes anyway) but I did have one occasion were she pulled forward on scent but I managed to get out to her before she self rewarded. It is becoming tedious in as much as all is going tickety boo and then we have an issue. I suppose statistically when your hunting for so long and covering so much distance the frequency of issues seems to be more....well frequent.

On another occasion she was quartering nicely then started pulling out, there was obviously a bird but I managed to get her back on track with a whistle and an "oi" in a short time the bird flushed in the exact area I assumed it was so I was quite chuffed with the fact that I had got her to ignore it (to a degree) and get back to quartering. A small victory I know but I am easily pleased 😁

You are correct, I am hard on myself, I still find it difficult to accept that all dogs lose there head at times.

Thank you for the reply and the advice, it is most helpful 👍
Muddling along in the hope that one day it starts to make sense.

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